Friday, 22 March 2013

The American Contemporary Culture, Art & Photography.


The American Contemporary Culture, Art & Photography.

Contemporary Art & Cold War Politics.



(Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world. 

 Voltaire )


 (Jackson Pollock, Abstract Expressionism, NY, 1950)
 100 BOOTS Move On
by Eleanor Antin
1971 – 1973,  Los Angeles, CA/


Peace Tower
Charles Brittin
1966
, Los Angeles, CA
  Atomic Bomb Tested - Explosion in Nevada, in 1951. 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Bz9g_rl2JnU 
Robert Frank;  Parade  Hoboken, New jersey 
Charleston, South Carolina, 1955.  by  Robert Frank


Danny LyonTwo SNCC Workers, Selma, 1963,  Whitney Museum of American Art, New York/


                                                                                   (  N. Y's Train Danny Lyon)


Two Female Impersonators Backstage, N.Y.C. 
Diane Arbus, 1961


 Robert Rauschenberg an American painter & artist. 
from thePop Art movement


Nam June Paik demonstrates Listening to Music through the Mouth in Exposition of Music Electronic Television, 1963; Photo by Manfred Montwé, 

by Manfred Montwé











Nam June PaikIn-Flux House, 1993. 


   

Nam June Paik (Video)

Source

Music of the Avant-garde, 1966–1973



John Updike juggles three apples in Ip
swich, Massachusetts, September 1966.  Updike    (1932-2009) is an American author of novels, short stories, essays, and poetry. Updike became noted for his elaborate, lyrical prose style. He served as a staff writer for THE NEW YORKER magazine from 1955 to 1957 and built his literary reputation as a frequent contributor to THE NEW YORKER.   


 Louise Bourgeois with Spider IV in 1996
  by  Peter Bellamy  
Louise Bourgeois, Hands and Mirror, 1995,  New York, 
 by Peter Bellamy.
   Louise Bourgeois , 1982, by Robert Mapplethorpe 
                                 4 men, 1958 by  David Park 
New Frontiers.
Nico, Andy Warhol, Moe Tucker, Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison, John Cale

The Velvet Underground - White Light White Heat 

Party at the Factory

John Cale said "It wasn't called the Factory for nothing.
 It was where the assembly line for the silkscreens happened. 
While one person was making a silkscreen,
 somebody else would be filming a screen test.
 Every day something new."
(The Last Gathering of the Beat Poets and Artists. City Lights Books, 1965.
Front Row (L to R): LaVigne, Murao, Fagin, Meyezove (lying down), Welch, Orlovsky, Homer.
Second Row: Meltzer, McClure, Ginsberg, Langton, Steve, Brautigan, Goodrow, Frost.
Back Row: Levy, Ferlinghetti.)
Ferlinghetti reading from his book Poetry as Insurgent Art (2007).
City Lights Books, 2007.

Vietnam Anti-War Protest | Washington DC 1967

Students  for  a  Democratic  Society, Antiwar protest 



 


 

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